The immune system is sensitive to pH and temperature changes



The immune system seems to be sensitive to pH and temperature changes as well as vice versa. More acidic environment is necessary in order of the immune system to do its job: destroy foreign invasion as infection and/or for removal of nonviable tissue damaged by trauma. Some confirmation of the relationship between pH and immune system:

• Extreme levels of alkalinity can set the immune system into action through cell destruction.

• Strong ions such as iodine in the thyroid could impact the cellular pumps, channels, transporters and isoenzymes. As the level of intrathyroidal iodine increases, so does the incident of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis.

• Some cytokines such as interferon can induce Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Interferon is impacting the potassium channels. Additionally, if pH changes enough there could be a charge generated which could impact movement possibly even for T and B cells.

• The medications procainamide and hydralazine have been known to induce autoimmune disease, specifically lupus. Procainamide impacts sodium channels while hydralazine impacts the calcium activated potassium channels and so both could impact pH levels. Chemical reactions need energy/heat/electrical charge or give off energy/heat/electrical charge, an excess that does not dissipate fast enough may set off the immune system.

• About 80 % of those suffering of Hashimoto’s are women. Women have increased antibody production compared to men in response to infection, vaccination and trauma. This difference could be explained by pH differences. Furthermore, with ovulation females have a significant measurable temperature rise. Probably with an increase in temperature there is a decline toward acidity. Sometimes it maybe temperature, while other times pH, and others a combination of the two that could set off the immune system.

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