Baking soda can have a beneficial effect on your autoimmune condition

inflammation, autoimmune disease

 

Baking soda, or sodium bicarbonate, is used in different areas of life: from cleaning your home, to mouth hygiene, and skin care.

Do you know that baking soda can have an beneficial effect on your health?

It can:

  • relieve minor skin irritation and itching
  • help to relieve heartburn, indigestion by neutralizing stomach acid
  • help fight colds and flu
  • lessen chemotherapy side effects

Moreover, researchers at Augusta University show that drinking baking soda daily may help reduce inflammation caused by autoimmune diseases.

Study shows by rats and healthy people that drinking a solution of baking soda is a trigger for the stomach to make more acid to digest the next meal and mesothelial cells sitting on the spleen to tell the fist-sized organ that there's no need to mount a protective immune response. In the spleen, as well as the blood and kidneys, they found after drinking water with baking soda for two weeks, the population of immune cells called macrophages, shifted from those that promote inflammation, called M1, to those that reduce it, called M2.

Mesothelial cells line body cavities and the exterior of our organs to quite literally keep them from rubbing together. Besides, these cells also provide another level of protection. They have little fingers, called microvilli, that can sense the environment, and warn the organs they cover that there is an invader and an immune response is needed.

Oral sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) intake stimulates splenic anti-inflammatory pathways.

Future studies testing the efficacy of oral NaHCO3 to limit injury in models of inflammatory disease will be required to determine the therapeutic potential of it.

Reference:

Ray, S. C., Baban, B., Tucker, M. A., Seaton, A. J., Chang, K. C., Mannon, E. C., . . . O’Connor, P. M. (2018). Oral NaHCO3 Activates a Splenic Anti-Inflammatory Pathway: Evidence That Cholinergic Signals Are Transmitted via Mesothelial Cells. The Journal of Immunology, doi:10.4049/jimmunol.1701605

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

error: Content is protected !!